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lolitabandita:

My photo project about gender presentation within the masculine and feminine spectrum. 

ami-angelwings:

nakedpastor:

My cartoon today on gender expectations & my concerns for Metaxas’ ideas about gender roles & male heroes: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/nakedpastor/2013/05/metaxas-and-male-heroes-only-please/

That cartoon is so applicable to so many things in society, such as the narrow depictions of women in terms of roles and appearance in fiction.

tyleroakley:

Miles is perfect.

This gif set never gets old.  A+, Miles Jai.  A+.

goodniteowl:

#Gender neutral restrooms, boom boom #PDX

the-platonic-blow:

Eddie Izzard on The Project (Australia) [x]

leavesandsouffles:

1/25 best Roseanne scenes → Nightmare on Oak Street

Roseanne Conner: These are a girl’s things, Darlene, as long as a girl is using them. 

hurruss:

jagged1:

discopeanut:

bansand:

nice gender did your mom pick it out for you

No, my dad did.

image

Andrea Gibson- Swingset

crazeace:

tobefairitismyonlyweakness:

askfuturedave:

thiefofspades:

frackyvengero:

I SAW WHERE COOKIES WEREN’T

AND SAID

NO

THIS WILL NOT DO

THIS WILL NOT DO

I MADE MY OWN FOOD WITH SCIENCE.

Every time I see this on my dash I smile.

Cookies are fucking goddamn delicious.

baking is manly as hell

THIS IS AMAZING

I WANTED COOKIES. SO I MADE SOME GODDAMN COOKIES.

chotpot:

People are butts about gender sometimes! So here is a comic talking about how it really isn’t a big deal!

When I was with James this week I wrote a little poem about gender
and decided to draw a comic for said poem.

Hope you guys enjoy!

Dr. Suess for the modern day.  Just saying.

Shannon Hale: WHY BOYS DON'T READ 'GIRL' BOOKS

shannonhale:

When I do book signings, most of my line is made up of young girls with their mothers, teen girls alone, and mother friend groups. But there’s usually at least one boy with a stack of my books. This boy is anywhere from 8-19, he’s carrying a worn stack of the Books of Bayern, and he’s excited and unashamed to be a fan of those books. As I talk to him, 95% of the time I learn this fact: he is home schooled.

There’s something that happens to our boys in school. Maybe it’s because they’re around so many other boys, and the pressure to be a boy is high. They’re looking around at each other, trying to figure out what it means to be a boy—and often their conclusion is to be “not a girl.” Whatever a girl is, they must be the opposite. So a book written by a girl? With a girl on the cover? Not something a boy should be caught reading.

But something else happens in school too. Without even meaning to perhaps, the adults in the boy’s life are nudging the boy away from “girl” books to “boy” books. When I go on tour and do school visits, sometimes the school will take the girls out of class for my assembly and not invite the boys. I talk about reading and how to fall in love with reading. I talk about storytelling and how to start your own story. I talk about things that aren’t gender-exclusive. But because I’m a girl and there are girls on my covers, often I’m deemed a girl-only author. I wonder, when a boy author goes to those schools with their books with boys on the covers, are the girls left behind? I want to question this practice. Even if no boy ever really would like one of my books, by not inviting them, we’re reinforcing the wrong and often-damaging notion that there’s girls-only stuff and you aren’t allowed to like it.

I hear from teachers that when they read Princess Academy in class (by far the most girlie-sounding of all my books) that the boys initially protest but in the end like it as much as the girls, or as one teacher told me recently, “the boys were even bigger fans than the girls.”

Another staple in my signing line is the family. The mom and daughters get their books signed, and the mom confides in me, “My son reads your books on the sly” or “My son loves your books too but he’s embarrassed to admit it.” Why are they embarrassed? Because we’ve made them that way. We’ve told them in subtle ways that, in order to be a real boy, to be manly, they can’t like anything girls like.

Though sometimes those instructions aren’t subtle at all. Recently at a signing, a family had all my books. The mom had me sign one of them for each of her children. A 10-year-old boy lurked in the back. I’d signed some for all the daughters and there were more books, so I asked the boy, “Would you like me to sign one to you?” The mom said, “Yeah, Isaac, do you want her to put your name in a girl book?” and the sisters all giggled.

As you can imagine, Isaac said no.

This doesn’t mean that a “good man” is always in the wrong when he’s arguing with a woman. It does mean that when men and women argue about gender justice, women are more likely to have insights that men have missed. Here’s the basic axiom: power conceals itself from those who possess it. And the corollary is that privilege is revealed more clearly to those who don’t have it. When a man and a woman are arguing about feminism – and the women involved happen to be feminists and the man happens to be an affluent white dude – the chances that he’s the one from whom the truth is more obscured is very high indeed.

©SW